theresearchguy https://www.theresearchguy.com Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:52:08 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.4 News & Entertainment Apps https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/news-entertainment-apps/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/news-entertainment-apps/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:52:08 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=50 Things to check out, if it strikes your fancy, in the category of new and entertainment Apps Wired Magazine (they have a free copy) and it is good just to see what can be done with the eMagazine Economist — great for roadtrips in that you can download the audio, and press play and it will “read” through the magazine article Netflix – the app isn’t as good as it could be, but when you

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Things to check out, if it strikes your fancy, in the category of new and entertainment Apps

Wired Magazine (they have a free copy) and it is good just to see what can be done with the eMagazine
Economist — great for roadtrips in that you can download the audio, and press play and it will “read” through the magazine article
Netflix – the app isn’t as good as it could be, but when you use it in combination with the netflix website, it works well.
Kindle — automatically makes anything you have on your kindle available on your iPad, and is a great reading experience… (Though, I prefer the kindle itself as a pure ebook reader).
Friendly — Reader for facebook, see post in social media on Friendly and other apps.
CNBC (great for financial news, stock quotes)

Jonathan Adams recommended the Grey’s Anatomy App, because “it has watermark technology that saves your place when you leave and come back” (and presumably because he likes Grey’s Anatomy. Though, knowing Jonathan, he may just think the technology is cool!).

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An App A Day: Converting Microsoft Word Doc to PDF for Mark-up https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/app-day-converting-microsoft-word-doc-pdf-mark/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/app-day-converting-microsoft-word-doc-pdf-mark/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:49:10 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=48 Apps: GoodReader + Pages Here is the situation: You’ve just received a word document, and you want to add some notes, or make some edits for a colleague to see. Problem is that Pages, Apple’s iWorks word processing App, isn’t great for comments. And, Good Reader let’s you read a word document, but not mark it up. (And, for some strange reason, Good Reader won’t let you convert the word document into a PDF). So,

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Apps: GoodReader + Pages

Here is the situation: You’ve just received a word document, and you want to add some notes, or make some edits for a colleague to see. Problem is that Pages, Apple’s iWorks word processing App, isn’t great for comments. And, Good Reader let’s you read a word document, but not mark it up. (And, for some strange reason, Good Reader won’t let you convert the word document into a PDF). So, how to you get from Microsoft Word to marked-up pdf?

First, take the Word doc (either in email, or in a App like dropbox or box.net) and hold you finger over it until “open in” shows up. Open in “Pages”.

Now, in Pages, tap on the top left, and return to “My Documents”. Below, you will now see a few symbols. The first one “send to” (with the arrow shooting out of the square”) is the one to tap. Email the document.

Next, you will see that you can send it as a PDF (or pages or word doc). Select PDF, type in your email address, and jump over to your email program.

Now, in the email program, you can tap and hold the PDF document, and select “Open in Good Reader”.

And, finally, you are good to go. You can mark-up the PDF document to your hearts content!

(Now, why Good Reader doesn’t do the conversion for you is beyond me, but this work around only adds a minute or two of pointless tapping, and then you’re on your way).
iPad Apps App, iPad

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Systematically Reducing Energy Consumption https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/systematically-reducing-energy-consumption/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/systematically-reducing-energy-consumption/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:47:47 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=46 My wife and I moved into our house about three years ago. It was an energy guzzler. We considered Solar, but with the number of years to get to break-even, we thought we should first look at whether we can start by reducing waste first. And, of course, being a researcher at heart, the only way to gauge the extent of our success is to track it! Using the data pulled down from P&G, our

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My wife and I moved into our house about three years ago. It was an energy guzzler. We considered Solar, but with the number of years to get to break-even, we thought we should first look at whether we can start by reducing waste first. And, of course, being a researcher at heart, the only way to gauge the extent of our success is to track it!

Using the data pulled down from P&G, our utility company, I reformatted the data to focus on cost (since that is what we cared most to control). I used the iPad Numbers App, because I wanted to see what it was like to chart in Apple’s spreadsheet program.

First, our change over to LED and compact florescent lights (CFL) has made a difference. We found the payback from our old school lights to LED on sale at $10 a piece is within a year for those rooms or lights that are on almost all the time (like our Kitchen, and entry lights). Even the $80 LED dimmable can light replacements will pay-off faster than solar.

The CFL is much less expensive — it is easy to find a deal for $0.99 lights. I don’t like these lights as much, because of the mercury and they seem sort of ugly. But, from an ROI stand point, they are hard to beat. The other thing that is an good ROI is getting the kids on board for conservation. (Kids please turn off your lights when you leave for school in the morning). Though, that is tougher to get done than it sounds!

While electrical cost has dropped a lot, gas has not moved much. This is mostly driven by winter heating. And, our next step will be to look to better insulation. The cost has dropped a little, which was probably our switch from gas range to an electric induction range. (iPad App Note: Numbers was kind of a hassle to get the data selection for charting, and to get the colors I wanted. I wanted the color to be consistent for the year across the charts, but gave up after a few minutes of trying to get Numbers to cooperate).

Conclusions: Faster ROI will be found by controlling energy costs with investments like CFL/LED and better insulation, and conservation compared with adopting solar.

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Forecasting Social Media Impact: The TMR Tool we will announce at Internet Week. https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/forecasting-social-media-impact-tmr-tool-will-announce-internet-week/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/forecasting-social-media-impact-tmr-tool-will-announce-internet-week/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:44:32 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=42 Ad Age got the scoop on our product announcement at Internet week. http://adage.com/article/digital/media-firms-roll-tool-measure-social-media-s-roi/227911/ This is a big deal in terms of channeling the wild west into respectable marketing planning society. I’ll blog more about exactly how it works after the announcement is “public” on Monday. You can get a sneak peak from the Ad Age story.

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Ad Age got the scoop on our product announcement at Internet week.

http://adage.com/article/digital/media-firms-roll-tool-measure-social-media-s-roi/227911/

This is a big deal in terms of channeling the wild west into respectable marketing planning society. I’ll blog more about exactly how it works after the announcement is “public” on Monday. You can get a sneak peak from the Ad Age story.

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How Does Social Media Create Value for A Marketer? https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/social-media-create-value-marketer/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/social-media-create-value-marketer/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:40:50 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=39 Social media works differently than traditional advertising. It creates value in part through engaging those already interested in the brand, and encouraging those people to share their brand enthusiasm with others. And, when people do pass along indicators of brand affection, this influence in others. Marketing Evolution has quantified this pattern of impact for the first time in 2007, and termed it “The Momentum Effect.” This research has been highlighted in a slew of books,

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Social media works differently than traditional advertising. It creates value in part through engaging those already interested in the brand, and encouraging those people to share their brand enthusiasm with others. And, when people do pass along indicators of brand affection, this influence in others. Marketing Evolution has quantified this pattern of impact for the first time in 2007, and termed it “The Momentum Effect.”

This research has been highlighted in a slew of books, and featured at the Word-of-Mouth conferences, and paraded around by social media advocates as quantitative proof of the value proposition for social media. The research has been broadly replicated for many different brands, in many categories. While social media can take many forms, and the value of each differs across the spectrum, there are common principles of the Momentum Effect visible in just about everything social.

Here is the original paper: MomentumEffect_RexBriggs

Here is a somewhat primitive video explaining the social media (we originally did this for internal use only, but if you’d rather watch for 10 minutes than read, it covers all the core materials as in the paper). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0aX-VA0soIM

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What is our “Fair Share” of the Federal Budget? https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/fair-share-federal-budget/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/fair-share-federal-budget/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:37:18 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=36 It is Sunday, and I spent the morning playing with my kids, as my wife watched a little CNN for the weekend politics. Obama has a lot to say about people pays their fair share, and it got me thinking, I wonder what is my fair share. Since income inequality is often analyzed by dividing wealth by population, then looking at the distribution of actual wealth vs. even distribution, I thought I’d try to do

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It is Sunday, and I spent the morning playing with my kids, as my wife watched a little CNN for the weekend politics. Obama has a lot to say about people pays their fair share, and it got me thinking, I wonder what is my fair share.

Since income inequality is often analyzed by dividing wealth by population, then looking at the distribution of actual wealth vs. even distribution, I thought I’d try to do the same with the federal budget and see what my fair share is, and see if I am paying it… The enacted federal budget is 3.796 Trillion and there are 117.5 million households. Dividing the budget by households means each of our fair share is $32,306.

Holly cow, I had no idea our federal government was spending that much. Looking it as a per household figure is really eye opening.

$32,306 – Wow.

$32,306 is our fair share of the government bill – but who pays that much?

I looked up the federal tax schedule, and plugged in 50,000 in income for a married household. The taxes paid are $6,654. Somebody else is picking up the remaining $25,653 bucks.

I plugged in 75,000 for a single person. The taxes paid: $14,881 — less than half the fair share of the tax burden.

80% of American households earn less than 100k, so I plugged that in. A married household will pay $17,244, leaving a little over $15,000 for someone else to cover. So where is the point where people begin to pay their fair share? For a single earner, it is $147,796. For married, it is $167,610. From this income level and above, they pay their fair share of $32,306 and more.

As I looked again at the income distribution, only 5 percent of households earn $166k or more. That means 95 percent of Americans are paying less than their fair share.

There is no question that I have benefited from government assistance. As a child, we needed food stamps, and school lunches. And, I’ve built a business, and am fortunate to be paying more than my “fair share” of the U.S. Government. It disturbs me that the political debate has vilified the rich as taking from the poor. In my lifetime, I have spanned the lowest “below the poverty line” income class and the highest — it seems to me we should be trying to figure out how to create the environment for more people to attain have economic mobility. I don’t think that comes from redistribution as much as it comes from wise investments in education and programs that give people opportunity rather than handouts.

Government is expensive. We need more people able to pick up more than their fair share of the tab.

Explanation of graphic: At the top is the number of US Households, arranged by income. Income is listed below. With a few small markers — For example, 80% of households make less than $91,705. The blue bars below show the percent of the “fair share” of US Government annual budget paid at each income level. I’ve calculated this using IRS website for both married and single. Other sources: Household calculations:

http://visualizingeconomics.com/2006/11/05/2005-us-income-distribution/#.UDGVRUKmBjg (using 2005 Income Distribution from Census). Federal Budget comes from: http://federal-budget.findthedata.org/l/83/1980 (I did not include the accumulated debt, which weighs in at over 130,000+ per household, last I checked).

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Fisker Karma vs. Tesla Model S: The tail of two fires. https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/fisker-karma-vs-tesla-model-s-tail-two-fires/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/fisker-karma-vs-tesla-model-s-tail-two-fires/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:30:33 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=32 Tesla Model S outsold Fisker Karma more the 20 to 1 in the first year. Marketing plays a meaningful role. Having written a few chapters on marketing a new car in my latest book SIRFs Up, using Fisker as an example, I discussed how to go about marketing a new eco-chic car. I interviewed Tesla marketing execs in the process, and was impressed with them then, and even more so now. While I happen to

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Tesla Model S outsold Fisker Karma more the 20 to 1 in the first year. Marketing plays a meaningful role.

Having written a few chapters on marketing a new car in my latest book SIRFs Up, using Fisker as an example, I discussed how to go about marketing a new eco-chic car. I interviewed Tesla marketing execs in the process, and was impressed with them then, and even more so now. While I happen to like the looks, comfort and functionality of the Fisker Karma better than the Tesla, there is no question the Tesla is a fine car that is exceptionally well marketed with PR, social media, YouTube, events, and direct email marketing. I have to say I am impressed by how well Tesla nails marketing.

Here is the direct email letter related to the fire. Contrast to the Fisker “lawyer-ran marketing” which took a totally different approach. While I like my Fisker Karma better, I have to say, Tesla’s right culture and marketing can go a long way to crossing the chasm. Hats off to Tesla. Well done.
October 4, 2013
About the Model S fire
By Elon Musk, Chairman, Product Architect & CEO
Earlier this week, a Model S traveling at highway speed struck a large metal object, causing significant damage to the vehicle. A curved section that fell off a semi-trailer was recovered from the roadway near where the accident occurred and, according to the road crew that was on the scene, appears to be the culprit. The geometry of the object caused a powerful lever action as it went under the car, punching upward and impaling the Model S with a peak force on the order of 25 tons. Only a force of this magnitude would be strong enough to punch a 3 inch diameter hole through the quarter inch armor plate protecting the base of the vehicle.

The Model S owner was nonetheless able to exit the highway as instructed by the onboard alert system, bring the car to a stop and depart the vehicle without injury. A fire caused by the impact began in the front battery module – the battery pack has a total of 16 modules – but was contained to the front section of the car by internal firewalls within the pack. Vents built into the battery pack directed the flames down towards the road and away from the vehicle.

When the fire department arrived, they observed standard procedure, which was to gain access to the source of the fire by puncturing holes in the top of the battery’s protective metal plate and applying water. For the Model S lithium-ion battery, it was correct to apply water (vs. dry chemical extinguisher), but not to puncture the metal firewall, as the newly created holes allowed the flames to then vent upwards into the front trunk section of the Model S. Nonetheless, a combination of water followed by dry chemical extinguisher quickly brought the fire to an end.

It is important to note that the fire in the battery was contained to a small section near the front by the internal firewalls built into the pack structure. At no point did fire enter the passenger compartment.

Had a conventional gasoline car encountered the same object on the highway, the result could have been far worse. A typical gasoline car only has a thin metal sheet protecting the underbody, leaving it vulnerable to destruction of the fuel supply lines or fuel tank, which causes a pool of gasoline to form and often burn the entire car to the ground. In contrast, the combustion energy of our battery pack is only about 10% of the energy contained in a gasoline tank and is divided into 16 modules with firewalls in between. As a consequence, the effective combustion potential is only about 1% that of the fuel in a comparable gasoline sedan.

The nationwide driving statistics make this very clear: there are 150,000 car fires per year according to the National Fire Protection Association, and Americans drive about 3 trillion miles per year according to the Department of Transportation. That equates to 1 vehicle fire for every 20 million miles driven, compared to 1 fire in over 100 million miles for Tesla. This means you are 5 times more likely to experience a fire in a conventional gasoline car than a Tesla!

For consumers concerned about fire risk, there should be absolutely zero doubt that it is safer to power a car with a battery than a large tank of highly flammable liquid.

— Elon
Below is our email correspondence with the Model S owner that experienced the fire, reprinted with his permission:

From: robert Carlson
Sent: Thursday, October 03, 2013 12:53 PM
To: Jerome Guillen
Subject: carlson 0389

Mr. Guillen,

Thanks for the support. I completely agree with the assessment to date. I guess you can test for everything, but some other celestial bullet comes along and challenges your design. I agree that the car performed very well under such an extreme test. The batteries went through a controlled burn which the internet images really exaggerates. Anyway, I am still a big fan of your car and look forward to getting back into one. Justin offered a white loaner–thanks. I am also an investor and have to say that the response I am observing is really supportive of the future for electric vehicles. I was thinking this was bound to happen, just not to me. But now it is out there and probably gets a sigh of relief as a test and risk issue-this “doomsday” event has now been tested, and the design and engineering works.

rob carlson
On Oct 3, 2013, at 12:29 PM, Jerome Guillen wrote:

Dear Mr. Carlson:

I am the VP of sales and service for Tesla, reporting directly to Elon Musk, Tesla’s CEO.

I am sorry to hear that you experienced a collision in your Model S 2 days ago. We are happy that the Model S performed in such a way that you were not injured in the accident and that nobody else was hurt.

I believe you have been in contact with Justin Samson, our service manager, since the accident. We are following this case extremely closely and we have sent a team of experts to review your vehicle. All indications are that your Model S drove over large, oddly-shaped metal object which impacted the leading edge of the vehicle’s undercarriage and rotated into the underside of the vehicle (“pole vault” effect). This is a highly uncommon occurrence.

Based on our review thus far, we believe that the Model S performed as designed by limiting the resulting fire to the affected zones only. Given the significant intensity of the impact, which managed to pierce the 1/4 inch bottom plate (something that is extremely hard to do), the Model S energy containment functions operated correctly. In particular, the top cover of the battery provided a strong barrier and there was no apparent propagation of the fire into the cabin. This ensured cabin integrity and occupant safety, which remains our most important goal.

We very much appreciate your support, patience and understanding while we proceed with the investigation. Justin keeps me closely informed. Please feel free to contact me directly, if you have any question or concern.

Best regards,
Jerome Guillen I VP, WW sales and service

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Driving Drives Tiger’s Golf Wins https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/driving-drives-tigers-golf-wins/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/driving-drives-tigers-golf-wins/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 07:10:28 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=28 I gave Eureqa (pronounced Eureka, but spelled with a Q&A) software a try. I decided to feed it Tiger Woods golf stats from 1997 to 2009 (with 2009 as a hold out). I wanted to see how the software worked to predict his wins, using the number of tournaments he entered, driving, fairways, greens and putts. I got the data from http://www.databasegolf.com/players/playerpage.htm?samid=WoodsTig01. I normalized and removed the 2004 outlier, which the software made REALLY EASY.

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I gave Eureqa (pronounced Eureka, but spelled with a Q&A) software a try. I decided to feed it Tiger Woods golf stats from 1997 to 2009 (with 2009 as a hold out). I wanted to see how the software worked to predict his wins, using the number of tournaments he entered, driving, fairways, greens and putts. I got the data from http://www.databasegolf.com/players/playerpage.htm?samid=WoodsTig01. I normalized and removed the 2004 outlier, which the software made REALLY EASY.

The conclusion of the analysis is that his wins can be pretty well predicted based on his driving stats. The prediction for 2009 is that he would win 4.3 tournaments. He won 6.

I could have made a better guess for 2009, the hold-out, by simply taking the average from 1997-2008 (5.25) or a ratio of tournaments entered to tournaments won (5.15) and gotten closer than the modeled answer. But, the model is trying to tell us “why he wins.” In that respect, the factor most often occurring in the models, and the key factor in the simpler models is Tiger Woods “driving.” Eureqa made getting to the answer really easy.
I like the software. it has much promise. The problem with the software is it will over-fit a dataset. The user needs to find the balance of simplicity and fit. Using a hold out is essential, and I wish the software made that easier to do. It would also be nice to delete multiple columns at a time, or multiple rows at a time to make organizing the data for analysis faster. I think the assumption is you will order your data in Excel, then cut and paste the table. But, I wanted to assemble the data from various excel spreadsheets, and that was doable, but not as efficient.

I tried Eureqa on this simple data set, then gave it some more complex data sets as well. I was impressed by the simplicity and power.

I highly encourage curious minds to download Eureqa and give it a try.

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Why I started CodeReno.org https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/started-codereno-org/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/28/started-codereno-org/#respond Wed, 28 Feb 2018 06:49:00 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=21 When I moved from California last year to the lower tax state of Nevada, my family and I decided to commit part of our tax savings to local charities. I grew up poor, and always felt grateful to be able to give back. My focus is on (1) Food & Family services and (2) Education. I am particularly interested in areas that open up economic opportunities for those that want to work hard and achieve

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When I moved from California last year to the lower tax state of Nevada, my family and I decided to commit part of our tax savings to local charities. I grew up poor, and always felt grateful to be able to give back.

My focus is on (1) Food & Family services and (2) Education. I am particularly interested in areas that open up economic opportunities for those that want to work hard and achieve a better future.

As a kid, in elementary school, I received free school lunches, and my mom used food stamps to feed us. She put herself through school (with some help) and within a few years made enough to support her family in a solidly middle class lifestyle. A few years later, I watched her and my dad (step-dad) prepare amazing meals and take them to the park to feed the homeless. Helping them serve instilled the honor of being able to give back.

When I was introduced to the Sacramento Food Bank & Family Services organization by Pat McClain, their chairman, I was impressed by their commitment to serve the working poor – not with hand outs, but rather with an exchange. They invested in education for the whole family and they distribute food to families in need in a farmer’s market style approach (mostly organic food), they help parents get trained on computer skills, and help kids with homework, they teach urban farming, and parenting classes for expectant mothers… I could go on and on about all the smart things they do (read more about their approach http://www.sacramentofoodbank.org/).

With our move to Reno, we found The Children’s Cabinet (http://www.childrenscabinet.org/). My boys and I toured the facility and saw their emphasis on graduating students, and helping families and keeping children safe. Loved it. Donated to it.

As I began to think about what can make a difference in Reno, the challenge seemed deeply economic. I attended the Smart Cities presentation, which discussed how Reno planned to re-focus itself as a College Town, and increased coordination of economic development around EDAWN.

As I talked with people, and listened intently, it seemed to me that the city was focusing on bringing in a “white night” to save the day by hiring thousands of people with great paying jobs. This is one approach. Sure it is worth a try, but I think the key is a longer view of economic development that invests in our next generation, while creating the right ecosystem to support growth now and into the future. I am excited to see programs like Sontag Entrepreneurship Competition at UNR (http://www.unr.edu/sontag) and the Reno Collective, which creates a hub for small business to work and interact. But I think we need to do more.

Where will the jobs come from for this next generation?

Many of the jobs will need to be created by small business. Big business cut 4 million jobs since 1990, while small business added 8 million (source). In addition, many small business will be one person shows (freelancers). Many jobs don’t exist yet. If you told me in High School that in five years I would work for Wired Magazine figuring out how to analyze digital marketing, you would have gotten a blank stare — because that stuff didn’t exist yet.

When I think about these trends, I think about the value of kids learning coding, and entrepreneurial skills. The first reason is not so much that I expect that they will all become programers — some might. But the value of learning code and entrepreneurial skills is that it teaches kids that they can create something from scratch.

I have three hopes for the CodeReno.org effort. I want kids in our community to…

(1) Discover how to teach themselves — coding is just one relatively easy thing to learn. If they can do this, maybe they will know that they can pursue any area they set their mind to.

(2) Think critically – coding requires step by step logic and thinking about the system. It is easier for our brain to tap into the emotional decision making developed though the dopamine feedback loop than it is to abstract and think logically and methodically. Therefore, building up the practice of engaging our pre-frontal cortex and other systems engaged in coding is a good thing. It is highly transferable to other advanced problem solving fields (medicine, engineering, etc).

(3) Experience a sense of accomplishment – I’ve watched the joy on my kids face as they’ve shared something they created. The post below is one of the first projects my son created using scratch without any help from anyone. I want other kids to have that joy too. (That joy releases that dopamine response to make it more likely that they will want to pursue creating something again in the future).

On a practical note, coding may also become a great career option. According to stats on csedweek.org:

  • Software jobs outnumber students 3-to-1. The gap is 1 million jobs over 10 years- and these are some of the highest paying jobs.

The national average for CS degrees is 2.5% and UNR is only producing 1.3% currently. Even with the 2.5% there are not enough skilled programmers to fill the demand. Increasingly, this leads US companies (mine included) to hire foreign citizens, or offshore at least some of the programming jobs. As a leader of a company, I will take talent from anywhere. I care about the mind and the character of the person, not the passport, or any other factor. I have offices in Boston, New York, Los Angeles, and Norther California. I can typically find talent in one of these big cities, and have paid for work visas when needed. I am extremely grateful to the amazing people that take pride in being part of Marketing Evolution, and appreciate the diversity of perspective our international team brings. But as a US citizen, I have to ask, should we be doing more?

  • 90% of schools in the US do not teach computer science.
  • In many countries, it’s required (China, Vietnam, Estonia. Soon UK, Australia)
  • The basics can be learned by anybody, starting in elementary school. But fewer than 10% of students try. Only 2% are women. 1% are students of color.

As a Reno resident, I am thinking about what creates a great community here.

Good paying jobs here can help our community. If we have great talent here, then companies like mine will hire here. Or, maybe the great talent decides to create their own company, and it creates jobs. The more talent, the more entrepreneurial opportunities, the more economic growth. This is how we build a robust community of people capable of building the next great technology. Furthermore, if we become a magnet for great talent from all over the world that wants to live and work here in Reno, our community will be enriched.

CS are well paid jobs, that afford lots of flexibility — whether someone wants to work for a big company, create their own company, or work as a freelancer — or take the skills learned from coding into medicine, engineering, clean-energy, manufacturing, or whatever, it seems like a lot of upside for our community.

I am incredibly grateful to share a vision with UNR Professors, and students, and the ACM club. While each of us may have a slightly different take on why it is important, and why we are volunteering our time, energy and money, together we hope to create an on-going opportunity for kids in Reno to learn to code.

If you want to help, visit the CodeReno site, and click the “Raise Your Hand” button.

We can curse the darkness that that Reno is behind in producing CS and teaching coding, or we can ignite a candle and bring some light into the world. CodeReno.org is a candle. Will you help spread the light?

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Computer Science Education Week https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/16/hello-world/ https://www.theresearchguy.com/2018/02/16/hello-world/#comments Fri, 16 Feb 2018 09:48:39 +0000 https://www.theresearchguy.com/?p=1 This post comes to you from my son, Caleb. He is helping me organize a Code contest for kids, using Scratch. You will find more information at CodeReno.org CALEB’S BLOG: (Tales of 5th Grade Coder) In about a month I had created my first good project. It was called space dodgers. It took me a few hours to create. I think the hardest part of making Space Dodgerz was the effort of making the game.

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This post comes to you from my son, Caleb. He is helping me organize a Code contest for kids, using Scratch. You will find more information at CodeReno.org
CALEB’S BLOG: (Tales of 5th Grade Coder)

In about a month I had created my first good project. It was called space dodgers. It took me a few hours to create. I think the hardest part of making Space Dodgerz was the effort of making the game. It took along time to make it because I wasn’t too familiar with the code I was doing. Also it takes a long time to make layers of the game.
CodeReno.org

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